Rio 2016: Jaguar in Amazon torch relay shot dead

jaguar

A jaguar has been shot dead shortly after it was used in an Olympic torch relay at a zoo in the Brazilian city of Manaus, the army said.

The female jaguar escaped its handlers after the ceremony on Monday and attacked a soldier, a spokesman said.

Four tranquiliser darts failed to stop it and a soldier shot it with a pistol.

Organisers for the Rio Games said it had been a mistake to exhibit the Olympic torch next to a chained wild animal.

Animal rights groups have condemned the killing, with some questioning why the animal was involved in the Olympic event.

“When will we learn? Wild animals held captive and forced to do things that are frightening, sometimes painful, and always unnatural are ticking time bombs,” Brittany Peet, director of captive animal law enforcement at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), said in a statement.

Brazilian physiotherapist Igor Simoes Andrade poses for picture next to jaguar Juma as he takes part in the Olympic Flame torch relay in Manaus, Brazil, 20 June 2016.Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionRio 2016 organisers promised there would be no more such incidents

The animal, called Juma, had been raised in the zoo in the Amazon since it was a cub along with half-a-dozen siblings.

The Olympic torch is relayed through Brazil leading up to the August opening ceremony.

Breaking news from Brazil indicates that a jaguar has reportedly been shot and killed after escaping her captors at a ceremony in the town of Manaus, where the Olympic torch was passing through on the way to Rio de Janeiro.jaguar

Disturbing photos taken at the event show the big cat, who was reportedly sedated, with a heavy chain around her neck as armed soldiers stand nearby. After the ceremony ended, this jaguar acted on her instinct to flee the second that she could.She paid the ultimate price, shot dead on the spot by a soldier.

When will people learn?

Wild animals held captive and forced to do things that are frightening, sometimes painful, and always unnatural are ticking time bombs—captivity puts animal and human lives at risk.

Everyone who is upset by the needless death of this jaguar, the gorilla Harambe,  or countless other exploited wild animals should stay far away from any business that puts living beings on display for human “amusement”—and should ask friends and family to do the same. Please share this story now and let people know that animals suffer—and die—when they’re used for entertainment.

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